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Links 1 through 10 of 83 by Charlie Schick tagged trend

BioMed Central "It just got easier to find #openaccess research for textmining" http://t.co/yltJRNYd #Scipub #textminig #vogue #trend

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"With new sequencing centers in Europe and the United States, BGI hopes its growing clout will help deliver the benefits promised by genomics—and revenue to pay off a mounting debt."

At a scale only China could do.

Oh, my.

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"Seeking to spur drug development, Stephen Friend has launched a daring series of initiatives to make biomedical research more open and effective."

Interesting fellow.

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"The first challenge that OSDD's cyber-community assigned itself was to glean more information from the M. tuberculosis genome. It was sequenced in 1998, but researchers had clues to the functions of only a quarter of its 4000 genes. In December 2009, OSDD set out to reannotate all possible genes. Some 500 volunteers got the job done in a mere 4 months. Now OSDD is trying to exploit these data. “The more people you put to work on the problem, the more chances you will have to identify the set of compounds that will likely make it through compound optimization, animal models, preclinical, and, eventually, clinical trials. If you increase your success chances, then your overall costs decrease,” says Marc Marti-Renom of the National Center for Genomic Analysis in Barcelona, Spain."

FoldIt, GalaxyZoo, now this. Is the next phase of computing networked human computing?

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"Global Industry Analysts (GIA) predicts the global probiotics market will be worth $28.8bn by 2015, even though the market is still considered to be in infancy. "

I like this.

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"But what happens next? Can Janelia Farm do 'great science' during the next 5 to 10 years? Will it pass Rubin's deletion test? Can it rewrite the introductory biology texts (Cech's favourite definition of great science), or foster “a couple of programmes that create a whole new direction” (Tjian's favourite)? That is the great unanswerable question. As Simpson says, “you can't engineer great science. You just have to create the conditions that make it possible, and see what happens.”"

Great overview of the current state of HHMI's experiment in cross-disciplinary collaboration. I say, step back and let it happen. Heck, it's only been five years.

But also, 1) don't measure it against traditional measures; 2) serve a an inspiration, if not model, for other privately (foundation) funded institutes. The government is at its limit and we're all fretting. We need new funding models. The HHMI and Jenelia is one.

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"Genomic epidemiologists say, it's time to use the technique to track microbial movements on a global scale. By routinely sequencing bacterial samples—perhaps up to a billion a year—scientists could pinpoint the sources of new outbreaks faster, determine whether a bug is resistant to antibiotics, and investigate how public policies or the use of certain drugs change the course of microbial evolution."

One part of my job is talking to "pharmaco"epidemiologist who take claims data and electronic health records and mine them for outcomes and drug safety and effectiveness. [Plug] Our product can take huge amounts of data and query it at blazingly fast speeds.

For sure, if we have some large pathogen vigilance data stream being added to a large data warehouse (ours), researchers can query and analyze the data and predict outbreaks before they happen.

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""Natural selection has favored that mix," says Johan du Toit, an ecologist at Utah State University in Logan. Natural selection, maybe, but not people. Convinced that other grass-chomping animals will drive their herds to starvation, ranchers in Kenya and elsewhere tend to keep their cattle separate from wildlife. But a new study suggests that thinking may be wrong. Wildlife, particularly zebras, can actually help a ranch thrive."

another strike against mono-cultures, in this case, cattle. I think this study is a good example of why folks need to take ecological views of plant and animal farming. For example, my son has been experimenting with the old Native American technique of growing corn (tall straight stalks), beans (that climb up the corn stalk), and squash or cucumbers (which spread low below these other two plants). True, our mechanized farming isn't set up for mixed farming techniques, but the benefits might drive the financials and the change.

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"A large European-Asian consortium brought some order to the chaos when it reported in a Nature paper in April that humanity can be roughly divided into three "enterotypes" depending on which genus of bacteria dominates in people's gut: Bacteroides, Ruminococcus, or Prevotella. People's enterotype appeared to be stable over time, but it remains unclear why your gut population might be so radically different from your neighbor's."

Yet another report on diet and gut microbiome. If I could start all over again in grad-school, I'd study this. Human microbiological ecology is going to be big in so many areas, helping us understand the effects that our microbiome has on our health. And of course, this will go hand-in-hand with practical use of naturally occurring microbes.

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"In Jonathan Swift's "Gulliver's Travels," Gulliver encounters a small group of immortals, the struldbrugs. "Those excellent struldbrugs," exclaims Gulliver, "who, being born exempt from that universal calamity of human nature, have their minds free and disengaged, without the weight and depression of spirits caused by the continual apprehensions of death!"

But the fate of these immortals wasn't so simple, as Swift goes on to report. They were still subject to aging and disease, so that by 80, they were "opinionative, peevish, covetous, morose, vain, talkative," as well as "incapable of friendship, and dead to all natural affection, which never descended below their grandchildren." At 90, they lost their teeth and hair and couldn't carry on conversations."

Long life versus living long. Thinking of the ring wraiths. :-P

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