Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 16 by Charlie Schick tagged engineering

"Here I’ll try to give a high-level picture of Ginkgo’s pipeline for organism engineering. If you’ve checked out our webpage, you’ll see that we have several different organism engineering projects happening at Ginkgo that span several different hosts. Our goal was to build out a pipeline that could support the engineering of all these very different organisms for very different purposes but that uses a shared pipeline. To accomplish this goal, we deliberately opted to decouple design from fabrication. Ginkgo organism engineers place requests via our CAD/CAM/LIMS software system. Those requests are then batched and run on Ginkgo’s robots."

This is indeed exciting. These folks are among the most experienced in synthetic biology and they are finally taking their engineering skills to the next level. They are reducing organism creation to a CAD request to an automated pipeline by an organism engineer. Really cool. [See more here: http://ginkgobioworks.com/works.html]

Share It With Others!

"Approved barely a month ago, the $30 million Living Foundries program should be sending out a request for proposals in the next few weeks and making awards several months from now. With its investment, over the next 3 years DARPA will support academic and corporate researchers for developing and applying an engineering framework to biology for biomanufacturing."

Here's a nice summary of the DARPA announcement made at the synthbio conference a few weeks back. Good to see the government funding agencies starting to pick up interest in synthbio and the practical uses of synthbio. The next 5 years should be quite interesting for those who are already doing synth bio. Also, big investments like this will get lots of students and post-docs flocking to synthbio, with a strong impact in 5-10 years. Yup. It's gonna be great.

Share It With Others!

"One of UCSF’s brightest young scientists and a key member of the Bay Area’s emerging synthetic biology community is heading east."

[via @jrkelly]

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

"No external power is needed: the lift lock functions by gravity alone using the counterweight principle."

I saw this on TV and have been thinking about it since. It's a great example of electricity-free machines that do amazing things. I like examples that remind us of a time before electricity, because I think we've become lazy and can only think of electronic and digital computer-based machines these days.

Share It With Others!

"In order to make a rubber tree's roots grow in the right direction - say, over a river - the Khasis use betel nut trunks, sliced down the middle and hollowed out, to create root-guidance systems. The thin, tender roots of the rubber tree, prevented from fanning out by the betel nut trunks, grow straight out. When they reach the other side of the river, they're allowed to take root in the soil. Given enough time, a sturdy, living bridge is produced."

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

"The new BIOFAB: International Open Facility Advancing Biotechnology (BIOFAB), with two years of funding from NSF and matching support from founding partners, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) and the BioBricks Foundation (BBF), aims to produce thousands of free standardized DNA parts to shorten the development time and lower the cost of synthetic biology for academic or biotech laboratories." [via @thisischristina]

Share It With Others!

Very funny. "A children’s toy inspires a cheap, easy production method for high-tech diagnostic chips"

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT