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Links 1 through 10 of 27 by Charlie Schick tagged brewing

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"We report on the remarkable degree of biodiversity in the wine yeast populations naturally present in a small area of Sicily where traditional (non-industrial) winery practices are still in place. Out of more than 900 yeast isolates recovered from late spontaneous fermentations, we detected at least 209 strains. Given that the characteristics of the wines produced were found to be industrially appealing, the study demonstrated the economic potential of preserving the patrimony of Sicilian yeast biodiversity and highlighted the importance of maintaining traditional wine making practices."

This is a great paper - studying the biodiversity of yeast obtained from traditional wineries; analyzing their genetic and metabolic qualities; and even using a few to make wines.

How fun. How inspiring.

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"Lager may have its roots in Bavaria, but a key ingredient arrived from halfway around the world. Scientists have discovered that the yeast used to brew this light-colored beer may hail from Argentina. Apparently, yeast cells growing in Patagonian trees made their way to Europe and into the barrels of brewers."

Great story about genomics solving an interesting riddle in brewing.

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"Senator Scott Brown yesterday condemned a rule change at the state’s Alcoholic Beverages Control Commission that beer makers say could harm 25 craft brewers in Massachusetts, and even put some smaller companies out of business. The ABCC issued the revised rule, which has yet to be finalized, earlier this week. It would require the roughly two dozen local brewers operating under a so-called farmer-brewery license to grow at least half of the hops or grains they use to make beer, or get them from a domestic source."

I think the ABCC has their heart in the right place - support local grain growers. But I'm not sure how this will impact brewers, as I don't think Massachusetts is a big grain paradise, say, like some mid-west state.

One thought might be to create a "Mostly Mass" sort of label identifying brews that use mostly local ingredients. I think that's more in line with how folks have been promoting local farmers than some blanket un-competitive license change.

What do you think?

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"Where others see barroom taps crowded with beer options, Chris Lohring sees opportunity brewing."

A nice article on the state of breweries in the region, the business, and the entrepreneurs. Quite exciting.

As for me, I'll stick to small time 5-gal brewing.

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Brewing good beer isn't something unique to Ireland, Germany, or the mountains of Vermont. In fact, there are quite a few craft breweries in Massachusetts that find an appreciative customer base both inside and beyond the borders of the Bay State.

Here are 10 breweries and brewpubs that produce their suds in the state, as well as the most popular beers they produce.

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"A new wave of niche breweries is the most noteworthy since the mid-1990s. New England is playing catch-up with California and other parts of the country already experiencing their own craft beer boomlets."

Take a look at the inner workings of a brewery.

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"A Brookline home brewer cleared a major hurdle this week on the way to opening a brewery of “farmhouse”-style beer in Fort Point. “It’s not a come-and-have-pints-all-night type place, it’s a come-and-have-a-sampler type place,” said Trillium Brewing Co. owner Jean-Claude Tetrault, 34. Trillium, which will have a storefront with a small tasting bar, scored a zoning variance Tuesday that allows for the manufacturing of beer on the site. Tetrault will apply for state and federal licensing in the next few weeks."

This is indeed a nice story. Looking forward to having a few of their beers.

[via @IDBoston]

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Is this a Pandora/Last.fm/Netflix/(put in the name of your fave recommendation, collaborative filtering tool) for brews? [Wondering all the possible biz models and social networking this can promote.]

Sign me up. :-)

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Did Big Beer kill the TV show about Dogfish Head brewery? This short article will send you off in different directions trying to gauge the likelihood of this idea. Very interesting.

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