Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 18348 Chris Yeh's Bookmarks

Why did you suspect it would be a drawback to be a specialist?
First, in labor markets with strong institutional screening mechanisms, specialization won’t be as valuable. In the absence of other information, it’s an important indicator of skill, but graduation from a top MBA program is a strong signal to the market that someone is qualified. In that scenario demonstrating consistency is no longer advantageous. Second, employers may discount experiences that incrementally extend previous efforts.

Conventional career advice is to find a specialty, a niche. So that’s wrong?
Among MBAs, there’s now a strong emphasis on building a consistent profile as a finance person or a marketing person. You end up with many similar people in the market. Specialization becomes commodified, giving you less bargaining power, because you’re easily substitutable. Plus, when the firm is used to hiring a lot of people like you, it’s easier to calculate your value compared with someone with diverse accomplishments.

Share It With Others!

Teamwork improves with time: America’s National Transportation Safety Board found that 73% of the incidents in its civil-aviation database occurred on a crew’s first day of flying together. However, as Amy Edmondson of Harvard points out, organisations increasingly use “team” as a verb rather than a noun: they form teams for specific purposes and then quickly disband them.

Share It With Others!

Jackson had access to students’ scores on the statewide standardized test, and he used that as a rough measure of their cognitive ability. This is the number that education officials generally look at when trying to assess teachers’ impact. But then Jackson did something new. He created a proxy measure for students’ noncognitive ability, using just four pieces of existing administrative data: attendance, suspensions, on-time grade progression, and overall GPA. Jackson’s new index measured, in a fairly crude way, how engaged students were in school—whether they showed up, whether they misbehaved, and how hard they worked in their classes. Jackson found that this simple noncognitive proxy was, remarkably, a better predictor than students’ test scores of whether the students would go on to attend college, a better predictor of adult wages, and a better predictor of future arrests.

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

Share It With Others!

The higher a wife rated on openness to experience or agreeableness, the more often the couple had sex. The husband’s personality, on the other hand, was not a predictor of sexual frequency.

Sexual satisfaction was another story. In this case, both partners’ personalities mattered. For men and women, higher levels of neuroticism were linked with lower levels of satisfaction. Intriguingly, husbands’ openness was negatively correlated with satisfaction, while for wives it was the opposite. And it was the individual’s personality — not their partner’s — that correlated with satisfaction.

But, as the authors note, this study — comprising 14 days for couples who are perhaps still in the honeymoon phase — should not be taken as representative of all couples in all stages of relationships of all time.

Share It With Others!

Reading Weigel’s “Labor of Love,” you can get the sense that women are now pinballing among the worst of all the dating systems that have come before. Like the shopgirls of the twenties, Weigel says, we turn ourselves into commodities, typing up dating-site profiles as if they were product descriptions, placing orders on one person and disposing of the next with a single swipe. We drift into reluctant long-term commitments, as the monogamists of the fifties did. Young women are still warned, as the career women of the eighties were, that we’re “dating on a deadline” and have only so much time before our eggs dry up—if we haven’t frozen them, in which case we must not let prospective partners in on the secret, lest they fear entrapment in the plans we’ve worked out for the future.

Share It With Others!

I’d like to submit Birdy’s cover of Passenger’s “Let Her Go.” Passenger’s song never really hit me; their flurry of analogies always seemed too cliche. However, Birdy delivers the lines with heartbreak on her lips; every word she utters her voices quakes; she seems on the verge of tears. The piano arrangement itself is okay, I guess, but there’s something in her delivery that yearns for lost love. Put your headphones on and close your eyes. This version is totally superior to Passenger’s hit in every conceivable way.

Share It With Others!

In 2011, Martha Beck Inc. (MBI) grossed $2.1 million, according to Beck. Revenue has risen 63 percent since then—much of the growth happening by 2013—at a company with exactly two full-time staff members (Beck makes three). Corporations frequently book her, too, for upwards of $35,000 a session. The attendees at Pismo Beach will bring to 4,121 the total number of people she and her team have trained to be coaches since 2008.

Coach training is an eight-month telecourse and Internet-based program. The cost is $7,770 for instruction led by Beck and master coaches, life coaches who’ve taken the certification course, completed 75 hours of paid coaching, and taken on extra training. Certification for a life coach costs $850 (and includes being listed on the Martha Beck website as a coach); the master coach certification costs an additional $8,500 and includes six months of instruction that culminate in a retreat at Beck’s home, the North Star Ranch, in Central California.

Share It With Others!

If capital accumulation or the rule of law had been sufficient, the Great Enrichment would have happened in Mesopotamia in 2000 B.C., or Rome in A.D. 100 or Baghdad in 800. Until 1500, and in many ways until 1700, China was the most technologically advanced country. Hundreds of years before the West, the Chinese invented locks on canals to float up and down hills, and the canals themselves were much longer than any in Europe. China’s free-trade area and its rule of law were vastly more extensive than in Europe’s quarrelsome fragments, divided by tariffs and tyrannies. Yet it was not in China but in northwestern Europe that the Industrial Revolution and then the more consequential Great Enrichment first happened.

Why did ideas so suddenly start having sex, there and then? Why did it all start at first in Holland about 1600 and then England about 1700 and then the North American colonies and England’s impoverished neighbor, Scotland, and then Belgium and northern France and the Rhineland?

The answer, in a word, is “liberty.” Liberated people, it turns out, are ingenious. Slaves, serfs, subordinated women, people frozen in a hierarchy of lords or bureaucrats are not. By certain accidents of European politics, having nothing to do with deep European virtue, more and more Europeans were liberated.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT