Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 6 of 6 by Bos Kabout tagged userexperience

Share It With Others!

"Most strikingly, 75% of guessers were wrong. You'd be better off tossing a coin than asking advice of these people."

Share It With Others!

Who, What, Where, When, Why (and How - it ends with a “w” cut me some slack). In school we were taught that these fundamental questions must be addressed in the process of creating a strong argument and delivering a legitimate story. In the world of User Experience, being able to accurately answer these 5 questions can be the difference between a product that instantly resonates with the customer and one that quickly makes its way to the Startup Graveyard.

Share It With Others!

UX is really just good marketing. Good marketers actually do a lot of what UX people do and vice-versa. It’s mostly a difference in terminology…any good marketing professional would tell you that knowing who your users are has long been recognized as good business.

Share It With Others!

In a comment an an earlier blog post, I was asked about users and the effect of different kinds of standards on users -- I had talked about the effect of standards on implementors but not about end users. The commenter made some claims about what end users wanted, with reference (presumably) to users of browsers.

This is hard, so I might take a couple of whacks at it, but here's one pass....

Share It With Others!

This understanding suggests that "beauty is in the eye of the beholder", as our authors say. This becomes the subjectivist view and probably remains a source of contention as your colleagues subjectively argue about which page design or graphic element really IS more beautiful (or useful).

But, as our authors point out, anyone who makes aesthetic judgments brings with them a processing background of habits, preferences, and conditioned responses that color their aesthetic judgments.

Therefore our authors adopt a third position, calling it the interactionist view. They suggest that beauty gets defined in how people "experience" the objective elements using their subjective cognitive and affective processes.

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT