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Links 1 through 10 of 102 by Barbara Haven tagged ux

User experience (UX) design has evolved significantly over the last several years. In the past, UX and web design could almost be used interchangeably. Modern UX, however, goes beyond on-screen design and into a world of device interfaces, functional pursuits, and brand differentiation.

In 2015, UX design cemented its place as an essential technology for businesses of all shapes and sizes. A user-friendly website, however, is only one part of UX. Companies developing proprietary software and those that invest in mobile apps must consider UX for each additional functionality. Year after year, target markets in an increasing number of industries start to embrace the changing nature of online experiences. Cognitive computing elements and responsive web design are no longer exceptions—they’re the rule.

...departments are refocusing their efforts on the changes taking place in the field of UX. Here are some of the most profound, innovative, and important trends taking place in the industry:

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s designers and developers we usually work with particular people in mind when creating something. This is our target end-user: someone with a certain set of goals, characteristics and motivations that will be accessing your services. Yet, even if you segment your users and consider usage scenarios for various behaviours, there are inherent qualities that, regardless, could apply to anyone: impairments and disabilities. Hindering people’s access based upon circumstances beyond their control is the worst thing to do, even unintentionally. If you’ve never experienced any such setbacks yourself, it’s difficult to imagine quite how some things could be so useless for others.

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Government innovators worldwide are experimenting with technology and focusing on improving user experiences (UX) to cut red tape and make programs and services better and more accessible to the public. The [Little Hoover] Commission highlights this work in its latest report, A Customer-Centric Upgrade for California Government, released in October 2015 and offered this showcase to hear directly from some of those innovators leading the change.

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As the number of choices increases, so does the effort required to collect information and make good decisions. Featuritis can be an exhausting disease for users.

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Input Field The input field is the bread and butter of forms. They’re used for anything that requires custom input from a user, not a selection of predefined options. Usernames, emails, addresses, passwords, websites, phone numbers. Make sure you use the correct HTML5 input when using input fields. They fall back gracefully on old browsers, and on new browsers (particularly mobile) they’re great for helping users to enter in the correct type of information.

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For years, the “home” button has provided a compass rose, the north star, a navigator’s ability to regroup to the familiar comfort of the homepage no matter how deep into a website we’ve gone. As users become more fluent in navigating the intricacies of the Web however, having a prominent home button is becoming an unnecessary navigation crutch — a visual obstacle that web designers increasingly eschew.

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The user experience of websites has improved by leaps and bounds over the years, but I still run into sites that make me ask, “What were they thinking?!” From a design perspective, it’s easy to get caught up in internal squabbles (“No, no, THIS is the content that has to be front and center”) or distracted by tools or methods (“I say we use lean UX on this project”). When this happens, we often forget that at the end of it all waits a person who wasn’t in on all these decisions, and just wants to get the information they need, buy the product, or be entertained for five minutes while waiting for the train. In the hopes it will help us all avoid these pitfalls, here’s my list of the five worst UX mistakes that I still see people making in website design.

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FROONT is a flexible tool for creating and collaborating on web design Try it

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Last year I welcomed the rattling death knell of several of my least favorite design elements and facets of technology. Some of them have died already, some are dying, and a couple have been recently diagnosed as “terminal.” Looking forward, I think their diminishing presence will make 2014 a better year for experience design. 1. The Drop-Down Menu

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