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Links 1 through 10 of 34 by Barbara Haven tagged network

I asked people on Twitter to grab drinks. I tweeted two complete strangers (one was a New York Times best-selling author) to ask if they wanted to get drinks. Lesson: The answer is always no unless you ask. I reached out to 1,000 strangers on LinkedIn. Result: Everyone who responded gave me great advice

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"Cyberwar" is a heavily loaded term, which conjures up Hollywood inspired images of hackers causing oil refineries to explode.

Some security celebrities came out very strongly against the thought of it, claiming that cyberwar was less science, and more science fiction.

Last year on May 21, the United States Cyber Command (USCYBERCOM) reported reaching initial operational capability, and news stories abound of US soldiers undergoing basic cyber training, which all point to the idea that traditional super powers are starting to explore this arena.

Recent activities with one government contractor and Anonymous, however, show clearly that cyber operations have been going on for a long while, and that the private sector has been only too ready to fill the cyber mercenary role for piles of cash.

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Economist: Untangling the social web

Alex Howard: "Spontaneous collaboration" and other lessons from the private sector and Bringing open government to the courts

Andrea DiMaio: Is Open Government Really Urgent?

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You may have noticed the more infrequent updating of EduDemic and EduDatum over the past week or two. That’s because our (small) crack squad of designers and developers have been hard at work creating something due to popular demand. It’s a new educational social network that’s free, easy to use like Facebook, and open to educators, education administrators, students, and other like-minded people who have a passion for learning.

Look again, this isn't Facebook!
Socially Learning

The new social network is called Socially Learning and features a robust set of tools to help you meet teachers, tweachers (we love that word it turns out!), and other new friends. You can even join regional groups where people from your area are conversing, sharing information, and perhaps even planning a meet-up.

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The Federal research community invites the public to read about the R&D themes, provide your feedback to refine them, identify existing private sector R&D that supports these themes, and to suggest ideas about public-private partnerships that can be used to drive mutual investment in key research areas. To participate, visit http://cybersecurity.nitrd.gov.

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Cisco is launching an iPhone app, called Cisco SIO, to put Cisco Security Intelligence Operations in users’ hands. The app gives giving users real-time access to security information and also lets users create personalized alerts to show security threats that could impact their network.

Powered by the Cisco’s Security IntelliShield Alert Manager Service, the app informs, protects and enables IT staff to respond in real time to alerts and threats to the network.

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The main goal of this technical conference is to provide women in technology with broad opportunities for increasing their visibility, networking, breaking feelings of isolation, role models and building community.

Previous research has shown that women in technology are less likely to have access to social networks at work and more likely to feel isolated. Yet, these networks ties are essential for career advancement.

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Polling for updates is bad. We've known this for about as long as computers have existed. So why are so many web-based services (SUP, RSS and Atom feeds, Twitter, etc.) based around polling?

The answer lies, first and foremost, in the asymmetry of HTTP. The web is split into two pieces: programs that make requests, and programs that handle them. It's very rare to see a single program behaving as both a client and a server.

To fix the asymmetry, we need to be able to act as if being able to respond to HTTP requests was within easy reach of every program, so that we can notify interested parties of changes by simply sending an HTTP request to them. This is the core idea of web hooks.

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