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Links 1 through 10 of 17 by Barbara Haven tagged image

In this chapter: We’ll learn three levels of accessibility for uncomplicated image types. We’ll work through a list of complicated image types and come up with ways to make them accessible. We’ll discourage the use of a few well-intentioned but counterproductive accessibility methods.

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Internet users crave images — the bigger, the better. But as developers, content creators, and site owners, images cause us no end of performance-related angst. According to the latest HTTP Archive data, the average page weighs in at 1795 KB, with 56% of that weight (1000 KB) comprised of images. This makes images arguably the most fertile ground for improving web performance. And this is why, at Radware, we focus so much of our R&D energy on image optimization. In this post, let’s talk about why images are so immensely valuable, and what we can do to make them as efficient as they are important.

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Adding alternative text for images is the first principle of web accessibility. It is also one of the most difficult to properly implement. The web is replete with images that have missing, incorrect, or poor alternative text. Like many things in web accessibility, determining appropriate, equivalent, alternative text is often a matter of personal interpretation. Through the use of examples, this article will present our experienced interpretation of appropriate use of alternative text.

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"I want to be able to credit the artist or photographer when I use it. I want to thank them with a link to their work.

If you were to look through my collection of images that I’ve gathered from the Flickr Creative Commons then you would realize how difficult it is to keep convenient records of where each image came from. I have a folder with hundreds of images.

In fact, I often stop by the Flickr Creative Commons and save 10 or 15 images at a time just so that I can use them later. When I do this, it is incredibly difficult to remember exactly where in the gallery I found it when I go to use it 3 or 6 months later.

I’ve created a solution to this problem.

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There is an important error in most photography scaling algorithms. All software tested have the problem: The Gimp, Adobe Photoshop, CinePaint, Nip2, ImageMagick, GQview, Eye of Gnome, Paint and Krita. Also three different operating systems were used: Linux, Mac OS X and Windows. These exceptions have subsequently been reported: the Netpbm toolkit for graphic manipulations, the developping GEGL toolkit, 32 bit encoded images in Photoshop CS3, the latest version of Image Analyzer, the image exporters in Aperture 1.5.6, the latest version of Rendera, Adobe Lightroom 1.4.1, Pixelmator for Mac OS X, Paint Shop Pro X2 and the Preview app in Mac OS X starting from version 10.6.

Photographs that have been scaled with these software have been degradated. The degradation is often faint but probably most pictures contain at least an array where the degradation is clearly visible. I suppose this happens since the first versions of these software, maybe 20 years ago.

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