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Links 1 through 10 of 60 by Barbara Haven tagged future

Chrome and V8 are committed to pushing JavaScript forward and have already started implementing the new features. You can try some of them today in the latest dev channel release. Here’s a summary:

Lexical scoping. Now "let" is the new "var" – traditional "var" declarations are complemented with "let" and "const". Both are properly block-scoped bindings, eliminating a common source of errors and weird behaviour. Function declarations are now officially allowed in local scope as well, and also obey lexical scoping. (Note: Lexical scoping is only available in ES strict mode.)

Collections. Efficient maps and sets will make your life easier. Any value can be used as a key or element, including objects. No surprises, no more need to abuse objects as dictionaries. (Caveat: Iteration over collections is not yet specified.)

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Tim O’Reilly, the founder and CEO of O’Reilly Media, the creators of books, magazines, conferences and events focused on sharing the knowledge of innovators, has been watching the bleeding edge of technology since the beginning of the Internet and open source software. We were able to talk with Tim this past week in Austin, Texas at South by Southwest as part of the Tech Cocktail Delivering Happiness at SXSW interview series. Tim shared his perspectives on technology, the future and today’s state of affairs.

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While going about my day, I sometimes engage in a mental exercise I call the Laura Ingalls Test. What would Laura Ingalls, prairie girl, make of this freeway interchange? This Target? This cell phone? Some modern institutions would probably be unrecognizable at first glance to a visitor from the 19th century: a hospital, an Apple store, a yoga studio. But take Laura Ingalls to the nearest fifth-grade classroom, and she wouldn’t hesitate to say, "Oh! A school!"

Very little about the American classroom has changed since Laura Ingalls sat in one more than a century ago. In her school, children sat in a rectangular room at rows of desks, a teacher up front. At most American schools, they still do.

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Shelly Blake-Plock writes: Last night I read and posted the clip on '21 Things That Became Obsolete in the Last Decade'. Well, just for kicks, I put together my own list of '21 Things That Will Become Obsolete in Education by 2020'.

1. Desks
The 21st century does not fit neatly into rows. Neither should your students. Allow the network-based concepts of flow, collaboration, and dynamism help you rearrange your room for authentic 21st century learning.

2. Language Labs
Foreign language acquisition is only a smartphone away. Get rid of those clunky desktops and monitors and do something fun with that room."

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Technology is making the resume obsolete faster than we think. Now, some candidates send LinkedIn profiles in lieu of resumes. They’re better than resumes in that they give extra pieces of information: recommendations, which can be misleading but often give some insight into the candidate’s personality, as well as the people we know in common professionally. The website Unvarnished takes LinkedIn recommendations to another level by making the reviewer anonymous, and therefore more candid.

But sites like oDesk and eLance more closely reflect the future of resumes and how companies hire. When you hire someone on those sites (or similar contractor marketplaces), you don’t see things like what college they attended, you see past jobs and employer ratings. This simple reputation score is much more reliable, fair, and is harder to fudge than any resume.

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It’s hard enough to visualize how our lives will be altered by technology in the next 12 months, let alone more than 40 years into the future. Somehow it seems appropriate that social media brought us in touch with the following footage of British science fiction icon and futurist Arthur C. Clarke from a 1964 BBC Horizon program. His statements about how we would communicate in the 21st century are eerily prescient, though some would argue that even though just about everything can be done remotely these days, the face-to-face meeting is as important as ever.

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Dave Winer wrote "Once the blogosphere had grown sufficiently that the central role scripting.com played was largely forgotten, I brought comments back. I've been mostly satisfied with them, but certain subjects evoke predictable and futile "arguments" in response and unless moderation is applied, they will spiral into a flamy back and forth that you can find in any of thousands of different places in the blogosphere. So I moderate according to a few basic guidelines. Permanent link to this item in the archive.

1. Keep your responses focused on the piece you're responding to.

2. No ad hominem attacks."

more as guidelines for moderating

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Social media is a growing trend that's here to stay, and many companies are keeping tabs on new social technologies as they emerge.

With new sites, services, apps and practices that help businesses connect more directly with customers coming online at a rapid pace, it's often helpful to zoom out a bit and keep an eye on upcoming trends on the cusp or just over the horizon.

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