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Links 1 through 10 of 104 by Barbara Haven tagged california

Making a case for accessibility can take many forms that are not focused on the bottom line: protecting human and civil rights, meeting legal obligations, or creating better designs for everyone. However, these discussions usually come around to the same question: How many people are affected and how much revenue can be gained? No matter how the numbers line up, a business case for accessibility based on how many and how much cannot add up to something that offsets the perceived costs—not enough people are affected and the costs of accessibility are not readily quantifiable. Lainey Feingold, a lawyer specializing in the field of disability rights law applied to technology, explains how in the mid-1990s a Bank of America executive stood up at a national convention and shifted the conversation, saying, “We have to stop counting—this is a civil rights issue.”

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Government innovators worldwide are experimenting with technology and focusing on improving user experiences (UX) to cut red tape and make programs and services better and more accessible to the public. The [Little Hoover] Commission highlights this work in its latest report, A Customer-Centric Upgrade for California Government, released in October 2015 and offered this showcase to hear directly from some of those innovators leading the change.

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[Microsoft] announced its support for the Global Initiative for Inclusive Information and Communication Technologies (G3ict) charter. G3ict calls for governments to demand only accessible technology from their suppliers.

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Universal design has been described as “the design of products and environments to be usable by all people, to the greatest extent possible, without the need for adaptation or specialised design.” When we consider the term ‘all people’ it covers a very wide spectrum of human abilities throughout all periods of a person’s life cycle. In recent times, universal design - or inclusive design - has moved into the mindsets of many industries, particularly web accessibility and information technology. This area has been quick to accept, advance, and create accessible online environments for everyone. Some of this advancement has been driven by disability rights movements, or through disability legislation or adoption of new accessibility standards prescribing ‘minimum’ requirements. But universal design goes beyond disability and accessibility, it considers everyone.

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In this chapter: We’ll learn three levels of accessibility for uncomplicated image types. We’ll work through a list of complicated image types and come up with ways to make them accessible. We’ll discourage the use of a few well-intentioned but counterproductive accessibility methods.

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Jamie shared some methods of how he browses the web including the use of VoiceOver to assist with reading and zooming in on content to reduce clutter. He pointed out that giving up on a website might not be an option as the web is used for essential services these days )such as renewing a license or food shopping). This is a great reminder that we need to ensure enough attention is given to cognitive accessibility as it’s less popular than other areas (such as screen reader support).

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Announced at the Mobile World Congress in Barcelona, Spain, last week, the company’s Mobile Accessibility Checker is an automated test to help strengthen the accessibility features of mobile applications. IBM says the tool automatically alerts developers to accessibility breaches, such as color contrasting and keyboard navigation and focus, and recommends corrections to help developers adhere to industry standards and government regulations.

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The legislation (SB 624) from State Sen. Joel Anderson, R- El Cajon, would create an Office of Accessible Technology within the California Department of Technology and create a new executive position appointed by the governor to head the office.

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conversation with a large university system that was considering deploying WordPress as a resource for faculty blogs, within the institutional requirements that the site had to comply with WCAG 2.0 at level AA. Rest installation reviewed by an expert blind user with JAWS, who had come back with a number of problems, including: Problems with navigation and information sharing with the content slider Problems with user feedback in the contact form Problems with missing alt attributes These weren’t the only problems cited, but that doesn’t change the nature of the problem. The problem is that none of these are characteristics of WordPress. The slider might have been from the theme, or from a plug-in. The contact form was probably a plug-in. The alt attributes? A user input problem, ultimately. One of Drupal’s advantages in accessibility is that it does provide a core mechanism for generating forms.

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