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Links 1 through 10 of 3325 John Sing's Bookmarks

Other recent posts on the Open Compute Project and what it's doing:

http://www.zdnet.com/article/open-compute-project-gauging-its-influence-in-data-center-cloud-computing-infrastructure/

http://datacenterfrontier.com/rackspace-open-compute-cloud/

Google today said it has joined the Open Compute Project (OCP), and the company will donate a specification for a rack that it designed for its own data centers.

Facebook founded the Open Compute Project in 2011 to share designs of servers and other data center equipment. Many companies, including Microsoft, have joined the project and contributed their hardware designs. While Google has been building its own hardware for years, it hasn't joined the project until now.

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The roots for the idea of AWS go back to the 2000 timeframe when Amazon was a far different company than it is today — simply an e-commerce company struggling with scale problems. Those issues forced the company to build some solid internal systems to deal with the hyper growth it was experiencing — and that laid the foundation for what would become AWS.

Speaking recently at an June 2016 event in Washington, DC, AWS CEO Andy Jassy, who has been there from the beginning, explained how these core systems developed out of need over a three-year period beginning in 2000, and, before they knew it, without any real planning, they had the makings of a business that would become AWS.

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What this interview is about: in behavioral genetics and medical genetics = explain differences. It's important to know that we all share approximately 99 percent of our DNA sequence. If we sequence, as we can now readily do, all of our 3 billion base pairs of DNA, we will be the same at over 99 percent of all those bases. That's what makes us similar to each other. It makes us similar to chimps and most mammals. We're over 90 percent similar to all mammals. There's a lot of genetic similarity that's important from an evolutionary perspective, but it can't explain why we're different. That's what we're up to, trying to explain why some children are reading disabled, or some people become schizophrenic, or why some people suffer from alcoholism, et cetera. We're always talking about differences. The only genetics that makes a difference is that 1 percent of the 3 billion base pairs. But that is over 10 million base pairs of DNA. We're looking at these differences and asking to what extent they cause the differences that we observe.

ROBERT PLOMIN is a professor of behavioral genetics at King's College London and deputy director of the Social, Genetic and Developmental Psychiatry Centre at the Institute of Psychiatry, Psychology and Neuroscience

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The in-depth report Flash Reliability in Production: The Expected and the Unexpected was released during last week’s Usenix Fast ’16 conference in California and is now available online. The Google experience was interpreted by Bianca Schroeder, an assistant professor in the computer science department of the University of Toronto, with Raghav Lagisetty and Arif Merchant of Google.

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Google's reducing their energy use while serving the explosive growth of the Internet. Most data centers use almost as much non-computing or "overhead" energy (like cooling and power conversion) as they do to power their servers. At Google they've reduced this overhead to only 12%. That way, most of the energy used powers the machines directly serving Google searches and products. Look at how they take detailed measurements to continually push toward doing more with less—serving more users while wasting less energy.

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other FB data center videos include: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8Rgje94iI0

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Joe Kava, VP of Google's Data Center Operations, gives a tour inside a Google data center, and shares details about the security, sustainability and the core architecture of Google's infrastructure.

Also, here's a Facebook Data Center video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y8Rgje94iI0

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Above is a Top 10 from 2015.

5 min Youtube on the #1 in Langfeng, China:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JM85k3fpd2w

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we decided to move our mobile device lab into a data center.

The slatwall.
Hardware: The mobile rack
One of the first issues we tackled when transitioning into a data center was creating a consistent environment for running tests. If we were to use the same racks for mobile device testing that we use for our servers in our data center, our tests would be unsuccessful because the Wi-Fi signal from one rack would interfere with the Wi-Fi signal from the next rack. We needed racks to be well-isolated from their neighbors — ensuring a consistent environment — in order for our tests to be reliable and to have reproducible results.

We custom-built our own racks, designing them to function as an electromagnetic isolation (EMI) chamber. Each rack holds eight Mac Minis (or four OCP Leopard servers for Android testing) that drive the phones to install, test, and uninstall the application we're testing. Each Mac Mini is connected to four iPhones, and each OCP Leopard server is connected to eight Android devices, for a total of 32 phones per rack. The phones connect to Wi-Fi via a wireless access point in each rack. These phones lie on a slightly tilted pegboard so mounted cameras can record their screens. Engineers can access these cameras remotely to learn more about how each phone reacts to a code change.

The post continues to describe the major challenges faced and overcome .

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