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Links 1 through 10 of 287 by Amy Gahran tagged search

Every day, I run into stories that might as well include these promotional bullet points:Please go to Google to find the web site of the company I mentioned in this article.Please go to Google to that report cited in this article.

...etc.

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"Did you know that Google is doing deals with carriers to provide their on-deck search? It is true that there are financial agreements between search engines (not just Google) and both mobile phone carrier companies (ex: T-Mobile, Verizon, etc.) and handset manufacturers (ex: Samsung , LG, iPhone, etc.) The search engine agrees to provide a search engine for the default web home page included on the phone. These are generally branded with the name & logo of the search engine, so most people would think that they provide the same results as if they were searching from Google.com or Google.com/m but THEY DON’T. While the results appear to be based on the existing algorithm, searches performed from these start-pages will give different results that appear to preference content from the carrier or handset manufacturer."

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"mobile browsers. First of all, they tend to use the same search engine on their mobile device as they use on their PC. Even though there are 234 million wireless subscribers in the U.S., only 10% use mobile search (which is still 23 million people). Adoption rates of mobile browsing are much higher in Europe. Finally, mobile searchers are goal-oriented: they want to get the info and get out. They don’t tend to browse or surf.

A few general practices for optimizing your site are:

* Keep your content brief
* Use brief, custom titles
* For mobile stats, check out MMetrics.com
* Mobile sites need to be as simple as possible to ensure compatibility among all mobile browser software."

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"First out of the gate with enhancements this week was Chomp.com. The company has been around since 2009, but is now offering a detailed search on both its website and App. Not to be outdone, Appolicious has now announced two new websites: AndroidApps.com and yap.appolicious.com.

While this market continues to heat up, it seems that both Chomp.com and Appolicious have distinct differences. The most obvious difference is that Appolicious has Yahoo’s marketing behind it, with the company having done a deal in April with the search giant that now has visitors to a number of Yahoo! properties seeing Appolicious content.

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"On Thursday, San Ramon saw a big breaking news story, of a 24-year-old menacing police outside a 7-11. They shot and killed him, after a standoff. Take a look at the coverage and you can see that the Contra Costa Times’ story has more depth, background and nuance. Patch’s story is straightforward, but lacking in those same qualities. That quick comparison may be typical for how a newspaper responds to the big, breaking story — one of unusual suburban daily drama — as compared to AOL’s user-gen start-up.

"As curious, type “San Ramon shooting” into Google, and on both web and news search, Patch comes up first. In addition, Patch’s story elicited nine comments by late Thursday evening; Contra Costa’s none.

"A small sample, but therein may lay this emerging tale of newspaper vs. Patch competition. The story quality is one thing; the ability to SEO and draw community comment may be another. That’s an emerging gulf worth paying attention to."

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Great 2009 Where 2.0 presentation. Really nails a bunch of things that bug me about Local search.

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"As promised, Google.com, the big page, the heart of the whole operation, looks different today. The company announced this a while ago. Instead of a plain white background, there is a fancy art photography background and you can also customize it with pictures of your own. Personally I hate this. I’m going to look for a photograph of plain whiteness so it can go back to how it used to look."

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Starting Wednesday, searching Google.com for iPhone and Android apps--from your iPhone or Android phone--will likely yield a mobile app as its result. The trick, it seems, is to enter the magic word, "download," before the name of the app you seek.
The resulting link and surround context, like a star rating and number of user reviews, isn't a direct download URL per se. More accurately, tapping the Google result opens the app's corresponding product page in the Android Market or in the iPhone's App Store.
Google isn't promising that app searches will work for every Android or iPhone title, but its uber-engine should populate results for popular and highly rated apps. The one remaining question we have is why someone would intentionally favor Google.com as an app resource rather than the phone's built-in storefront, particularly if the Web search leads to that marketplace anyhow.

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Good basic starting point. Intended for commercial sites, but applies to organization sites & other projects.

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