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Links 1 through 8 of 8 by Amy Gahran tagged misinformation

"Once it became known that Lightfoot had not in fact gone to his eternal reward, plenty of people spent the next several hours doing another thing that people love to do on Twitter: blame Twitter for spreading a fake news report. But as Peter Kafka correctly points out, Twitter didn’t kill Gordon Lightfoot — traditional media did. It appeared to start with a prank phone call (remember the telephone?) to the management company representing Lightfoot’s close friend and fellow musical legend Ronnie Hawkins, from someone pretending to be Lightfoot’s grandson.

"Hawkins then started calling people to let them know, who in turn alerted Canwest News Service, which called Hawkins to confirm the news and then published a brief news item that got picked up by a number of the chain’s newspapers. That report was then spread by reporters on Twitter, including Canwest political reporter David Akin, who later wrote a blog post about the role he played in the story."

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Audit Bureau of Circulation's new job: statistics "fluffer" for a flaccid news biz. Seriously, why aren't advertisers revolting over this blatant manipulation?

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"So if journalism isn't the business of a newspaper, what is? Pull back the lens. At their peak, local newspapers did two things: They created community. And they provided the local marketplace for goods and services. These services were so profitable, that they subsidized the civic good of journalism.

"The reason newspapers are in trouble today is because they have lost their dominant position on both of these fronts. When it came to community, the sum of news and information in a newspaper created a shared base of knowledge, set the conversations about civic life, and provided a bond that created a sense of place. Today, as newspapers have shrunk, and as the audience has splintered, the newspaper no longer serves as community hub. Having lost all of these things, all that is left is the journalism. And on its own, we're discovering this is not something people will pay for."

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Sigh... more reflexive anti-poly bigotry, spreading misinformation. This blogger is on a rampage against Steve Pavlina over that well-known self-development blogger's recent public choice to experiment with going polyamorous.

Personally, I don't know enough about Pavlina to gauge the integrity of his motives, or his ability to undertake this particular change in a healthy, honest way. But I do know that being poly in a mono world takes courage, and Pavlina does appear to have the consent and support of his spouse (who is choosing to remain monogamous). I think it's especially difficult being "out" about being poly -- and especially sharing those experiences publicly -- since bigotry such as this post is rampant and surprisingly reflexive and vitriolic.

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Ill-informed, poorly supported anti-blogger tirade by Paul Mulshine published recently in the WSJ.

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"Paul Mulshine's whole WSJ column is essentially a rewrite of the hundreds [of anti-blogger diatribes] that came before and would not be worth noting except the hear-say quote is from a blogger who actually [provides original reporting and analysis]

"The quoted but un-named blogger used to reinforce his points is none other than me--JD Johannes.

"Most recently I produced, shot and edited video reports for TIME Magazine's website and my video was aired on WCBS-TV New York, KWTV-TV Oklahoma City and KOTV-TV Tulsa. I've made TV shows, dozens of customized "sweeps pieces" for local TV and produced five documentaries.

"I do not know why Mr. Mulshine did not give my name. If he had, it would undercut many of his statements. (Or perhaps he did google me and for some reason thought I was not the type to read the Wall Street Journal.) Mr. Mulshine's use of a misleading hear-say quote explains well the demise of his beloved newspaper.

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Another remarkably ill-informed screed against the Media Bloggers Association. I'm surprised to see such poorly researched stuff from Cory Doctorow of all people. Glad Mary Hodder, Liz Sabater and others weighed in via comments to correct misinformation.

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