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Links 1 through 10 of 377 by Amy Gahran tagged media+evolution

Clay Shirky: "What's going away, from the pipeline model, isn't the importance of news, or the importance of dedicated professionals. What's going away is the linearity of the process, and the passivity of the audience. What's going away is a world where the news was only made by professionals, and consumed by amateurs who couldn't do much to produce news on their own, or to distribute it, or to act on it en masse.

We are living through a shock of inclusion, where the former audience is becoming increasingly intertwined with all aspects of news,

This shock of inclusion is coming from the outside in, driven not by the professionals formerly in charge, but by the former audience. It is also being driven by new news entrepreneurs, the men and women who want to build new kinds of sites and services that assume, rather than ignore, the free time and talents of the public.

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"HTML5 adds many new features, and streamlines functionality in order to render these processor-intensive add-ons unnecessary for many common functions.

Assuming content providers sign on (and many are), this means you won't have to worry about installing yet another plugin just to listen to a song embedded in a blog or watch a video on YouTube. Similarly, this is a big deal for platforms that either don't support Flash (e.g., iPhone and iPad), or have well documented problems with it (e.g., Linux). It will be a particular boon to those smartphones for which supporting Flash has proven problematic."

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"Journalism is a profession for storytellers, and our newsroom culture celebrates romantic myths that are generally hostile to structure. We enjoy jockeying with authority, poking bureaucrats and annoying anal-retentive city editors. Few journalists are good with numbers, and we don't see that as a weakness. It's all part of a rebellious "ink-stained wretch" identity that hasn't reflected reality in at least a generation, if in fact it ever did.
So I understand my curmudgeonly colleagues when they scoff behind my back at the word "metadata." They don't see its value, so they mock it. The beancounters? I expect even less from them. And the newspaper management class? Don't get me started.
That's why I don't expect newspapers to lead this charge. It's far more likely that television, or a web-only start-up, will take the lead. What's left of the newspaper industry will follow suit once it has exhausted every other possibility. Because that's just how they roll."

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"SIVA VAIDHYANATHAN: If we decide that the only level playing field will be that wire coming out of the wall into our personal computer, we might find that we've relegated all the freedom in the world to the eight-track tape deck over the next 20 years, and that could be a terrible mistake."

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"The ways of reaching an audience are now limitless. And there is a premium for “sticky” experiences that engage consumers, over the old-fashioned billboards and banner ads which consumers are more likely to overlook. And building these experiences can be risky, and costly.

"Still, companies are taking the gamble, buying up companies with no clear revenue model, and investing in experimental outreach strategies for which “success” has only a few solid metrics.

"To navigate the muddy waters of digital outreach you need a guide. Sarah Szalavitz is one of the more informed and experienced folks in the social media world. Founder and CEO of 7-Robot"

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Excellent exploration of the past and future evolution of a blog network.

"The next big step is to translate those papers and discussions into something that can be understood by people outside of the narrow discipline – the lay audience. That lay audience is also stratified. A scientist in one field is lay audience for another field, but is highly educated and tends to think like a scientist. Then there are generally well educated people who are interested in science. And then there are people who don’t even know if they would be interested in science. Thus, there need to be several different levels of presenting science to the lay audience. And there need to be both “pull” (for interested audience) and “push” (for not yet interested audience) strategies for disseminating scientific information."

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Re: testy complaints from Washington Post staffers about having people who dare to publicly express opinions in their midst:

"What the complaints don’t recognize is that the personal branding approach isn’t only about self-aggrandizement or a license for punditry. It’s a response to the straitjacket of “traditional” journalism, which presumes that there is only one way to tell a given story, and that all professional journalists will converge on it. It’s a tool to get past false equivalence and he-said/she-said reporting and blandly written, conventional-wisdom-spewing “news analysis” stories, and of saying, “Here is what I, an intelligent, critical observer who has earned your trust (or not) by virtue of my prior work, find to be interesting, newsworthy, and true—and, as important, what I find to be not true.” It is one response to the very real editorial failures of political journalism, which too often fails to inform readers of what is actually at stake. "

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"Dan Gillmor argued that the government's subsidy of broadband would be a more appropriate way for the federal government to support journalism than to provide direct payment to establishment media.

"I agree. Payments to establishment media fund a limited number of existing voices. Expanded broadband coverage - in both geographical reach and availability of more bandwidth to all - would create fertile ground for the growth of many more voices.

"This is the battle that will be fought in the courts and in Congress over the next months, and years. Will we allow a limited number of broadband ISPs to use their market power to limit the bandwidth that consumers and producers may access? Or will we use the collective power of our government to expand bandwidth to more consumers, to create more entrepreneurial opportunity?"

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"Yesterday, two stories from Aol’s DailyFinance appeared in the Sunday print edition of the Daily Telegram, a newspaper in southern Michigan. These stories appeared on a business page that would otherwise have been produced almost entirely with stories from the Associated Press. The Daily Telegram got permission to publish these Aol stories not through a big corporate content deal, but directly through a peer-to-peer relationship — The Daily Telegram simply subscribed to DailyFinance’s newswire in Publish2’s News Exchange.

"Now I’m going to tell you why what you see on this page of the Daily Telegram could play a decisive role in the race between Aol, Demand Media, and Yahoo to win the prize of big brand advertising on the web, and why it is also pivotal to the future of news."

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"Whether on a lunch break, riding the train, or simply kicking back on the couch with a post-work beer, why not read something awesome. CellStories brings a new story, every day to your phone or iPad. Free and surprising, we strives to bring you writing that's unexpected. Like all good stories, some are true, some are not, and many fall in that wonderful grey area between.

"Have a phone that can read QR Codes? Just zap this one, and start reading!"

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