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Links 1 through 10 of 363 by Amy Gahran tagged conversation

Ethan Zuckerman: "It would be a mistake to conclude that the “internet intellectuals” Evgeny calls out in this piece were silent on concerns about Haystack simply because we’ve been speaking privately, not publicly. I’ve offered counsel to several funders of circumvention tools about Haystack, offering concerns that the code and protocols were unpublished, unverified and untested. To the best of my knowledge, none of the people I’d spoken to ended up offering funding for the project. I spoke to any journalist who asked me about the project and offered a similar answer. In a post discussing his involvement with covering Haystack and potential conflicts of interest, Cyrus Farivar makes clear that I’ve expressed a great deal of skepticism to him offline about the project."

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Great explanation of a Hashtag:

"For those of you who aren’t familiar with the world of Twitter yet, using a hashtag (#) before a word is a way of creating a topic in Twitter. By putting a topic like #boulderfire into a tweet, you are actively joining the conversation. Twitter users can filter on that word and see every tweet about that topic."

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"Twitter doesn't always feel like a conversation as people use it in different ways. In the same way that talking isn't always conversation, sometimes it's a command, an expression of surprise or an aid to thought. In other words, Twitter isn't just social, it has a big informational component,"

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Great, imspirational audio podcast. I especially like her idea of mashing up a museum with a pub!

"According to Nina Simon, museums should be centers of social interaction and creativity. Too often, they force us to be merely a passive observer, able only to admire and witness. The ideal museum engages the audience, uses their comments, and allows them to create works of their own. Nina Simon's goal is to make every institution reach this utopian state.

"The first step is to change the structure of our museums: Exhibits should be designed for interaction. People should be told to participate, and should feel good doing it. Comments should be promoted, shared, and implemented. And unity and involvement should be paramount; no more wandering by yourself, but real connection with others. Museums belong to the public. Shouldn't they be all they can be? Nina Simon thinks so, and she has the formula to make it happen."

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"not everyone has a blog, and not everyone is on Twitter or Facebook. One of the benefits of having comments is that they are open to everyone — although that is obviously part of what can make them so noisy as well. The barriers to entry are low, and so there are plenty of “drive by” comments and trolling. Having people respond on their own blogs or on Twitter and Facebook can also fragment the conversation on a topic, making it difficult to follow and causing potentially valuable responses to be lost or not recognized properly."

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"While reporting on both sites is top-notch, I was shocked to discover the lack of interaction from the journalist’s in the sites commenting conversations. The comments I did observe, for the most part, were thoughtful and poignant. Don’t get me wrong, there were a fair share of inappropriate comments, but they did not outshine the good stuff. People in these commenting communities were asking questions about the articles and also coming up with some great solutions to issues some of the articles addressed. But there was no journalist interaction to be found. Zero. Zilch. Nada.

"I was disappointed. Isn’t one of the responsibilities of a quality journalist playing the role of honest broker of information and referee in the community discussion? Places like comments on news sites are quickly becoming the new public forum. Excuses of little time and short staffing are not holding up in this dog-eat-dog state of the newspaper industry."

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"I wonder if we can have it both ways. How would it work to provide an incentive for people submitting to some form of verified identity or registering through Facebook Connect (not verified, but Facebook is a place where most people identify themselves accurately)?

"What if those comments appear on the same page as the story or post, and you have to click to another page to read or join the anonymous comments? Or could you put them all on one page, but the anonymous comments go to the bottom while comments from verified users go to the top. Either of these approaches would disrupt the flow of conversation (for instance, an anonymous response to a verified-ID comment would appear on a different page or far below). On the other hand, the real flow of comments is often pretty uneven, with responses appearing several comments apart from the original comment, and with some appearing in chronological order and others posting most recent comments on top.

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Roundup of key points, and viewpoints, expressed in a conference call last week on entrepreneurial journalism education.

Personally, I'm thinking j-schools and biz schools can be partners in this, but the real action would probably work best with an apprenticeship model, not a degree model. You learn this stuff by doing it, not in a classroom.

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George Kelly told me about this system, used to manage audio comments phoned in to a news site & get content from them for the site.

"Record on-the-fly with any phone using Evoca’s publicly available phone numbers --- recordings appear instantly in your account in MP3 format. You can register up to 30 phone numbers and 30 Skype accounts to invite enable work groups, classes, project teams, or families to record into the same Evoca Express account. Upgrade to a Local or Toll-free subscription, and in addition to your dedicated phone number and custom welcome greeting, you also can register up to 30 phone numbers and 30 Skype accounts."

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I'll be live-tweeting this event.

"Rather than reviewing tactics and social media platforms, this workshop will provide you with a strategic overview of how to evaluate key areas of your company including customer service, marketing communications and human resources and determine why and how they might benefit from social media participation. Don't expect breathless cheerleading expect a strategic overview of what you need to know to make solid management decisions in this new communication paradigm."

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