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Links 1 through 10 of 50 by Amy Gahran tagged Kindle

"Are we fooling ourselves in thinking $139 is cheap? Maybe not. It's widely held in consumer electronics circles that $100 is the holy grail of all price points, that "magic" spot, as Wired's Gadget Lab put it, where people start to make purchases out of impulse rather than careful calculation.

"E-readers are inching toward that point. Forrester analyst James McQuivey writes on his blog that some e-readers may hit the $99 mark by the holiday season this year. In five years, he says, only the very-high-end models will cost that much, with lower-end e-book readers going on shelves for just $49. (By comparison, Apple's iPad, which some use as an e-reader, currently starts at $499.)"

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App just released today. I'll get this when my Droid arrives in July.

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"While the Kindle and Nook 3G readers have no monthly access fees, the iPad 3G's data plans start at $15 a month. But plenty of users are willing to fork that over, and the iPad features a variety of e-book applications -- including the "BN eReader," which connects to Barnes & Noble's e-book store.

"Thanks to that kind of competition, the price tag of the Nook, Kindle and other reading-only devices will probably fall to $99 toward the end of 2010, Weiner said.

"The devices just didn't evolve quickly enough," Weiner said. "It's possible that this E-Ink tech has had a very short life. In the future, I can see book publishers giving them away with a bundle of e-books."

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Intriguing window on how people perceive what the read. I'd love it if you could look up this info by specific genres, topics, or titles.

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"If you’re trying to decide which side is right, ask yourself this question: Why should consumers support the right of book publishers to charge whatever they want for their product? Since when does the manufacturer or distributor of a thing get to set the price? Surely the retailer is the one who should be allowed to determine the price, based on market demand and a host of other factors (including what price the manufacturer charges him to supply it). In this case, that retailer — or the closest thing to it — is Amazon.

"If MacMillan wants to have its e-books on the Kindle, or its printed books in Amazon’s online store, then Amazon gets to decide what to pay for them. Even if a quasi-monopolistic situation has developed with the Kindle, Apple’s iPad should ensure that it is shortlived."

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"It is impossible for an independent author like Violet Blue to publish free for Kindle. From what I can see there is one of two possibilities here, both of which make a much more deeper and interesting story:

"Possibility #1: Amazon is entering into special agreements with certain independent authors – and thus not playing a square game with the rest of their authors. Perhaps this is to drive traction to their e-reader, but to the detriment of maintaining a level playing field and equal publishing ecosystem. Or…

"Possibility #2: Mainstream publishers (who apparently use different platforms to publish ebooks into Kindle marketplace) are able to set a zero price on their books. I note this option because despite the “independents kick it to the man” fairy tale Motoko Rich paints in her NY Times piece, those two free books written by Ms Blackstock are also available as ‘hard-copy’ paperbacks for $10.19 published by publishing house Zondervan. Not so ‘independent’ after-all.

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"Unfortunately, e-reader technology also presents significant new threats to reader privacy. E-readers possess the ability to report back substantial information about their users' reading habits and locations to the corporations that sell them. And yet none of the major e-reader manufacturers have explained to consumers in clear unequivocal language what data is being collected about them and why.

"As a first step towards addressing these problems, EFF has created a first draft of our Buyer's Guide to E-Book Privacy. We've examined the privacy policies for the major e-readers on the market to determine what information they reserve the right to collect and share."

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If this works, it might allow me toread my Kindle books on other e-readers, so if I want to switch to another e-reader my current e-books aren't marooned on my Kindle. Makes me less tied to that device in the long run. If it works.

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"Skiff has partnered with Marvell (NASDAQ: MRVL), one of the world’s leading semiconductor companies, to help create the world’s first “system on a chip” for e-reading. This innovative component will enable manufacturers to accelerate the development of high-performance e-reading devices.

"The Skiff service includes an innovative advertising system that will combine the impact and engagement of print with the dynamic capabilities of digital. Skiff is collaborating with publishers, leading advertisers and agencies to establish appropriate standards, formats and metrics for e-reading, and to validate them through consumer research.

"Skiff is also partnering with Nielsen and comScore to help facilitate media planning and buying through the Skiff platform, as well as to provide publishers and marketers the necessary analytics to measure the effectiveness of e-reading advertising."

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Google Editions, announced at Frankfurt Book Fair: "What this means is that instead of downloading and owning a digital edition of a book as you would through the Amazon Kindle or Sony's Pocket Reader, you are essentially paying to access it from the cloud, with the ability (presumably through Google Gears) to go through an offline version as needed."

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