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Links 1 through 10 of 20 by Aditya Banerjee tagged computers

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Will the iPad transform the netbook\notebook industry the same way the iPhone transformed smartphones? The key may be the fact that the level of openess of the respective platforms before the Apple devices came along.

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Lots of opinions. It ultimately boils down to the type of laptop & battery you have.

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Fusing a keyboard to pants - now that's innovation. Too bad only one half works.
And a video of them in action - http://blip.tv/file/2095987
via http://hackaday.com/2009/05/11/keyboard-pants/
via http://www.engadget.com/2009/05/12/diy-keyboard-pants-destined-for-the-geek-catwalk/

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Vocaloid is a singing synthesizer application software developed by the Yamaha Corporation that enables users to synthesize singing by typing in lyrics and melody.
More info on wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vocaloid
Sample youtube video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GqdB0yspQVA

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The inspiration behind HAL singing the "Daisy" song in 2001: A Space Odyssey?

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Computers might struggle to exhibit intelligent behaviour, but blindly performing arithmetic calculations is surely their forte. Or is it?
The calculation of where to look for confirmation of an incoming missile requires knowledge of the system time, which is stored as the number of 0.1-second ticks since the system was started up. Unfortunately, 0.1 seconds cannot be expressed accurately as a binary number, so when it's shoehorned into a 24-bit register — as used in the Patriot system — it's out by a tiny amount. But all these tiny amounts add up. At the time of the missile attack, the system had been running for about 100 hours, or 3,600,000 ticks to be more specific. Multiplying this count by the tiny error led to a total error of 0.3433 seconds, during which time the Scud missile would cover 687m. The radar looked in the wrong place to receive a confirmation and saw no target. Accordingly no missile was launched to intercept the incoming Scud — and 28 people paid with their lives.

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