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Links 1 through 10 of 23 by Suw Charman-Anderson tagged programming

Kevin: An interesting Python development environment for creating interactive documents.

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Creating API mashups has matured alongside the explosive growth of open APIs to create a new type of service: the API aggregation business. These innovative businesses combine APIs from multiple providers to build new products and services. via Pocket

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Kevin: A clever and fun tutorial for Ruby on Rails.

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Kevin: Foundation-funded journalism organisation ProPublica has a good guide on how to scrape data from websites. Sometimes you can extract data from websites that do not have them in existing data formats. The guides go into detail on how to crack data from PDFs and also how to use Ruby to code scrapers. It's not necessarily a beginners guide, but it's a good resource.

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Kevin: A visualisation toolkit from Stanford. They have a number of examples of how to use the toolkit. The site explains: "Protovis is free and open-source, provided under the BSD License. It uses JavaScript and SVG for web-native visualizations; no plugin required (though you will need a modern web browser)! Although programming experience is helpful, Protovis is mostly declarative and designed to be learned by example."

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Kevin: Michelle Minkoff at Poynter's E-Media Tidbits highlights a great new tool for scraping data from websites. What is scraping data? Before the days of APIs, developers and hackers would often 'scrape' data from websites. This would take data, often from an HTML table, and output the data in a useful format such as CSV that could be more easily manipulated using data tools such as spreadsheet or database software.
Minkoff writes: "It often takes a lot of time and effort to produce programs that extract the information, so this is a specialty. But what if there were a tool that didn't require programming?

Enter OutWit Hub, a downloadable Firefox extension that allows you to point and click your way through different options to extract information from Web pages."

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Judith Towend at journalism.co.uk talks about Ruby in the Pub, a meeting of developers and journalists. "The evening was also a meeting of cultures; as journalists explained their various work brick walls and developers explained the differences between various coding languages and platforms." It's really important for journalists and developers to work together. I've spent a lot of my career with feet in both camps, being a working journalist while testing new technology on the fly. It has been a rare position. There are misunderstandings in both camps, but hopefully, this type of cultural exchange can change that.

Most useful for me was hearing about the projects developers are implementing in their respective organisations and the tools they are using.

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Kevin: Aron Pilhofer of the New York Times just mentioned this on Twitter, and it's an interesting site where developers and journalists (hackers and hacks) can help each other out.

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