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Links 1 through 10 of 31 by Suw Charman-Anderson tagged government

Kevin: "An online database of more than 4000 Chinese leaders in government, politics, the military, education, business and the media."

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Kevin: Simon Briscoe, formerly of FT and now of data start-up Timetric, talks about the great advances in public data but also some of the outstanding issues including how dirty the data can be. He asks: "How many ways can you spell 'Accenture'?" It's well worth reading.

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Kevin: My friend and former colleague Simon Rogers writes about his favourite UK government data sets. It's a great post for budding data journalists in the UK. Well worth keeping handy.

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Kevin: A deep look at non-profit journalism start-up Texas Tribune. Like other non-profit news groups, they have a number of different sources of revenue, from foundation and large donor support to events. They have also had a lot of success with publishing data. One thing the article talks about in great length is the risk taking culture at the Tribune. Multimedia editor Elise Hu said: “Instead of being in a place where I feel like I don’t have a lot of control over the hierarchies and bureaucracies that are in place,” she says, “here we can say, ‘Let’s try this. Let’s just go ahead and do it, and if it doesn’t work, let’s fix it.’ ”

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The Sunlight Foundation in the US announces winners of its digital design competition. "Submissions ranged from an impressive redesign of the IRS to a brilliant infographic showing how a bill becomes a law, to scrollable guide to the Senate, to an inspired UI redesign of the Social Security Administration."

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Kevin: A great head-to-head comparison of Data.gov and the recently launched Data.gov.uk (a launch that I covered for the Guardian). The verdict: "While Data.gov.uk was just recently launched publicly, it has many advantages over Data.gov. It's easier to use and geared towards developers, who, let's face it, are the only ones who are going to do more with the data than open it up in Excel. Data.gov has some catching up to do. Both still have a long way to go. Both are good steps in the right direction."

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Kevin: A dynamite post by Marc Ambinder of The Atlantic looking at not only Google's struggles with Chinese cyber power but more broadly the US. The first line is a bombshell: "U.S. intelligence officials have concluded that December's mass cyber attack against 33 American companies was most likely the result of a coordinated espionage campaign endorsed by the Chinese government." Even further down in the post Ambinder talks about differences in US and China cyber security stances. He asks: "If China is so intent on stealing stuff from us, why haven't we (the US) responded?" Fascinating post. The Atlantic with Ambinder and James Fallows has been an excellent source on Google-China-US.

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Kevin: Government 2.0: What does "Open Government" mean for the networked generation? written by Howard Rheingold's Community and Social media course at Stanford.

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Kevin: In Europe, governments are paying to retrain journalists and to provide newspapers to teens as newspapers struggle during the recession. Could such plans work in the US?

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Kevin: Simon Collister has a truly fascinating and rigorous look at how political parties in the UK track online influencers and engage with key political bloggers and with the public at large through digital networks. Simon "also tried to fit these findings into a critical framework based on the work Manuel Castells has completed in mapping and analysing the Network Society". Castells categorises actors as programmers or switchers. In the UK, Simon believes that Conservatives are programmers and Labour are switchers. Well worth a read.

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