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Links 1 through 10 of 20 by Suw Charman-Anderson tagged fuckwittery

Kevin: Gary Andrews looks at how The Sun in the UK played an own goal in its attempts to engage bloggers to flesh out its coverage. After contacting bloggers and asking whether they would like to participate in their coverage, The Sun went ahead whether the bloggers gave permission or not. Chris Taylor from "It'll Be Off wrote to Gary: "I want to make it abundantly clear to everyone: I have nothing to do with this. I want nothing to do with this. And I am furious that the good(ish) name of my little blog, that ceased to be a concern some six months ago, is being used by the worst of all tabloids as some fucking publicity machine for their horrendous sweepstake generating iPhone app, and their even more horrendous newspaper.” Rights seem only to apply to media companies not to content creators.

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Kevin: A news aggregator contacts Dow Jones asking them how to pay for and licence their content. The aggregator was told that no such licence was available. Furthermore, "We would not allow our content to be used in this form. Please do not archive, spider, link or otherwise mention or use any content from any Dow Jones International publications on your website. We hereby confirm that we do not allow the use of our IP on your site." The company has contradicted this statement since. What's the story? One would think that they would think about accepting money. Maybe not. It's pretty easy to see why the news industry is in trouble.

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Kevin: Another insightful and critical article looking at iPad 'app' design. I'd have to agree that the first generation of magazine apps is little more than multimedia brochure-ware. It really is as many predicted a throw-back to the CD-ROM era of the early 1990s. I still am completely amazed that Wired charges you $5 for a deck of image files. The articles aren't text but images of pages. It's a ridiculous retrograde step, and frankly, I think the market will punish them, as well it should. The print fundamentalists are hijacking digital. They might make some money in the short term, but it will be a brief victory.

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Kevin: "France could start taxing Internet advertising revenues from online giants such as Google, using the funds to support creative industries that have been hit by the digital revolution, a newspaper reported on Thursday."
Sigh. Will 2010 be the year the analogue world declares war on the internet? It would appear so.

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Kevin: Steve Yelvington hits the nail on the head, once again, about AP and the horribly botched announcement about the hNews microformat it's effort to 'protect' its content.

He writes: "Some geeks at the AP got together with some geeks in Europe and came up with a really smart idea. Unfortunately, that smart idea got sucked into the swirling vortex of panic and craziness that reigns at a lot of media companies these days."

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Kevin: This was my read of the whole AP 'DRM' debacle. The hNews microformat allows them to track the news, but it won't 'protect' their content. As Ryan Singel points out: "As a means of improving indexing and search, this approach works just fine. As a shield against unauthorized use of content, however, it is easily thwarted. Indeed, it is designed to detect unauthorized use under conditions a content thief would be unlikely to use: Simply cutting and pasting AP content will remove all underlying code (as an overly ambitious aggregator might). So will re-typing it (as a commenting blogger might)." They would probably better publishing all of their content as PDFs if they really want to lock down their content

What's really sad is that the AP has shown how technically ignorant it is on so many levels with this episode. hNews doesn't provide a 'container' for news, and they can't explain how it 'protects' content because it doesn't.

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Kevin: The superficiality and artificiality of commentary passing as news with respect to assessing Barack Obama's First 100 Days. The artificial mark dates back to FDR, when he met with Congress every day for the first 100 days of his presidency. It was a similar time of crisis as the US was mired in the Great Depression. But now, Howard Kurtz says: "Forget about FDR. It takes nothing more than a glance at recent history to see how absurdly premature this benchmark is. " And then explains the why it's still done. "So why do we do it? The media love anniversary-type stories."

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Suw: Apparently the web is a vipers nest of misinformation and rumour and Something Needs To Be Done. Er, how about starting with education, especially of the ignorant, technophobic media and government? If they weren't so damn credulous we'd all be better off.

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Suw: I can't believe that Facebook is still acting so badly. I'm so glad that I never joined.

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Suw: I could just kiss Charles Arthur for this piece. Sadly, much of the music industry remains welded to the past, and shows no indication that they are even capable of change. Oh well, the world will just change without them.

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