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Links 1 through 10 of 18 by Suw Charman-Anderson tagged amazon

Amazon Web Services now offers a hosted version of the R programming language, providing an easy way for individuals and organizations to start and test their big-data-styled analysis projects. via Pocket

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Kevin: In the wake of Jeff Bezos buying the Washington Post, a look at bringing yhe Amazon model to journalism.

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Kevin: A comment from someone who has worked both at thr Washington Post and Amazon in what Bezos purchase means to the paper.

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Kevin: Mark Mulligan of Forrester Research writes in paidContent: "We are currently in the midst of a painful transition, and we don’t yet have a set of next generation media products that consumers will pay for on the scale they paid for physical products."

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Kevin: Amanda Michel of ProPublica talks about the foundation-funded investigative journalism organisation uses Mechanical Turk to assemble data sets.

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Kevin: Amazon has announced a new programme for its Kindle e-reader that will allow publishers to keep more revenue for some of content they release on the platform. For publishersm and authors, the Kindle hasn't been a good deal for them. They only get 7-15% of the list price for digital books. Under the new programme, they will get to keep 70%, but the deal comes with strings attacheed. "The list price for your title must be both between $2.99 to $9.99 and be 20 percent below the lowest physical book price; title also must be “offered at or below price parity with competition, including physical book prices”. The title also needs to be included in a broad set of features in the Kindle Store, e.g. text-to-speech. Finally, the title must be made available for sale “in all geographies for which the author or publisher has rights”.

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For newspapers, there is no magic bullet. Charging for online content is not a magic bullet—in fact, in most cases, it may do more harm than good. Micropayments are not a magic bullet—though they may (or may not) bring in...

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Kevin: The title is pretty self-explanatory on this one. Publishers Lunch, a daily paid newsletter, did some reporting and research and found based on numbers from Amazon's Kindle forum that: "over half of reporting Kindle owners are 50 or older, and 70 percent are 40 or older". Joshua Benton at Nieman says after seeing these numbers, "It’s older folks — not the gadget crowd, not the young bookloving crowd, and not the mathematical intersect of the two." If Kindle readers are older, this is not going to capture the demographic that newspapers looking for new revenue streams are hoping for.

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Kevin: Steve Yelvington looks at the idea of the Boston Globe moving to a paid content model based on Amazon's Kindle. Rolling out a Kindle will require a lot of upfront capital, something hard to come by during the credit crunch. He suggests looking at the mobile phone industry for the kind of costs you'd need to amortise over six years. Moreover, he looks at the loss of revenue from classifieds, display advertising and banner advertising on a device like the Kindle. He also worries about Amazon as a middleman who will take a slice of an already lower margin business than newspapers.

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