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Links 1 through 10 of 14 by Suw Charman-Anderson tagged advice

Kevin: Good advice from Lane DeGregory to a young journalist.

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Kevin: A good piece by a young journalist in Australia on how to break into the industry. Show initiative. Be a sponge and learn lots of skills. Take advantage of opportunities that come your way. Networking. This pretty says it all. Starting in journalism is hard in 2013, but it's always been hard to get a start. This is good advice that doesn't mean it will be easier but that you'll increase your chances.

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Kevin: An interview with New York Times interactive news editor Aron Pilhofer on strategies to get more buy-in around data journalism. A useful interview in which he describes how he conducts in one day a course that trains journalists 80 percent of what they need to know to carry out data journalism or computer-assisted reporting projects.

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Kevin: Some very good advice from the editor of Techmeme on writing. To be honest, it's good advice for anyone trying to catch the eye of an editor or most discerning readers.

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Kevin: A great piece, although I might quibble with a few points, for journalists. Most of it is really about writing rather than journalism. I wish there would be more focus on reporting. That's what I worry that we're losing.

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Kevin: As a journalist, I found that engaging users around journalism was as much of an art as a science. It took an understanding on how online communities operate that isn't always intuitive or easily explained, especially to those not familiar with online community dynamics. I'm not sure that I agree with all of these points, especially the issue about being effective and having 95% of people hating you. I think that it confuses and inadequately explains what it means to be effective and what it means to have impact. However, there is a lot of good food for thought.

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Kevin: Nathan Yau at the incredibly wonderful visualisation blog, FlowingData, gives some simple tips on how to think like a statistician. It really does depress me the innumeracy shown in a lot of journalism. What's even more galling is when this innumeracy allows journalists to be duped by spin. Nathan has some good tips, but it's probably no substitute for a good grounding in basic maths and statistics.

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Kevin: Suw and I are in a huge transition right now. I'm transitioning from having a stable job in major, world-class journalism institutions to something quite different. Dan Blank has a great post on some friends who have seized this transition. That's what Suw and I are doing. It's great to read other people's stories.

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Kevin: Barbara Ehrenreich's commencement address to the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism class of 2009 on May 16. "We are not part of an elite. We are part of the working class, which is exactly how journalists have seen themselves through most of American history - as working stiffs. We can be underpaid, we can be jerked around, we can be laid off arbitrarily - just like any autoworker or mechanic or hotel housekeeper or flight attendant.

But there is this difference: A laid-off autoworker doesn't go into his or her garage and assemble cars by hand. But we - journalists - we can't stop doing what we do."

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Kevin: Innovators and entrepreneurs fail forward, and the founder of Meetro, a location-aware IM platform, has shared his lessons on TechCrunch. Success isn't the only teacher.

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