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Links 1 through 10 of 24 by Suw Charman-Anderson tagged UGC

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A controversial newspaper designed to be largely made up of user-generated content has published its first new-look edition. Publisher Johnston Press has relaunched Lincolnshire weekly Bourne Local as The Local, with the aim of generating up to three quarters of its content from users. via Pocket

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Kevin: A good look at how journalists verify media coming out of Syria. They go through a number of steps that journalists use.

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Kevin: An interview with Jimena Urquijo, the VP of business development for Kantar Media-TGI Latina, looking at the trends driving higher rates of UGC engagement in Latin America than other markets. "Latin Americans are outspoken, informed and open to new technologies. Latin America has leapfrogged into the Internet bandwagon which may partially explain why UGC is so popular and growing so fast in the region. The region bypasses certain phases in the launch of new media and new technologies."

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Kevin: Kantar Media's Global TGI looks at the higher levels of UGC - comments and articles submitted to news sites - by Latin American internet users when compared to users in Europe and the Middle East.

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Kevin: Research from Kantar Media's Global TGI looking how Latin Americans submit comments and articles to news sites at higher rates than internet users in other regions. The study focuses on major markets such as Brazil, Argentina and Mexico but also has some information on smaller markets such as Peru.

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Kevin: Karl Schneider, the head of editorial development at B2B publisher RBI, has some excellent comments to make about "conversational journalism" and UGC. In terms of UGC, there is no one-size-fits-all strategy. In terms of "conversational journalism", he said that "that journalists need to move away from producing and distributing content to engaging in conversations with users and working off the back of their ideas/thoughts to create content that is useful and interesting to that ’community’ around a subject". Excellent points.

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Kevin: Hat tip for this to Cyberjournalist.net. Scott Porad, part of the team behind the LOLCat site, I can haz cheezburger writes: "Previously I addressed the misconception that user-generated content is free. To make user-generated content work, Cheezburger expends significant cost to sift through all the user submissions to find the best quality content. However, including this expense, content costs us less to acquire and is undoubtedly of higher quality. This fundamental win-win is the promise of crowd-sourcing and user-generated content."

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Kevin: Charlie Beckett writes: "60 000 people sent in material to the BBC during this year’s heavy snowfall in the south of England - yet during the recent heatwave the BBC’s user generated hub only got 60 - why?

Some of the answer is obvious. Snow is more fun to film."

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Kevin: Reuters Global Community Editor Mark Jones looks at how different news organisations including the Huffington Post have handled running web coverage of the post election protests in Iran. Mark wondered why the HuffPo might have a large number of private emails, more than the Guardian, the BBC and the NYTimes. I would hazard a guess that it has something to do with the HuffPo's southern California roots, home to a large Iranian ex-pat community. But that's just a guess.

Mark also made this observation: "CNN via its iReport, and the BBC via its Have Your Say service, all had rich seams of user-submitted pictures and videos. But they didn’t appear to be able to weave such material into their running commentary on the Web — perhaps a case of being overwhelmed with material and being forced to keep it in silos."

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