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Links 1 through 10 of 70 by piers young tagged research

Nice to see the research. VAK seems way to coarse-grained and simplistic.

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an entire industry has sprouted based on learning styles. There are workshops for teachers, products targeted at different learning styles and some schools that even evaluate students based on this theory.

This prompted Doug Rohrer, a psychologist at the University of South Florida, to look more closely at the learning style theory.

When he reviewed studies of learning styles, he found no scientific evidence backing up the idea. "We have not found evidence from a randomized control trial supporting any of these," he says, "and until such evidence exists, we don't recommend that they be used."

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A large body of research shows that mandatory teacher collaboration, sometimes called “professional learning communities,” gets results. The world’s best school systems foster a culture of sharing what works and what doesn’t. In the high-scoring schools of Finland, South Korea and Shanghai, studies show, teachers are not like private emperors in their classrooms; they make their practice public, becoming the “learners of their own teaching.” Yet teamwork has fallen out of favor in schools in the United States in recent years — it’s hard to do well and easy to cut at budget time.

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in conclusion, first, there’s no evidence of a clear-cut digital divide. Use of technology varies with age, but it does so predictably, over the whole age span. And secondly, although younger people are more likely to be positive about technology, there is evidence that a good attitude to technology, at any age, correlates with good study habits.

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The Department for Education’s current review of the National Curriculum is intended to identify the essential knowledge that pupils need, to make the curriculum more focused than it currently is, and to hand control back to teachers.
But how children learn is as important, if not more so, than what they learn. Michael Gove has spoken of his concerns about ‘the drift of educational thinking … away from subject disciplines and towards cross-cutting, thematic, multi-disciplinary learning’. He believes that ‘one thing stands out in all the most successful schools … – they rest on traditional subject disciplines’.
Is this right? This report poses three questions:
Do all the most successful primary schools structure learning around traditional subject disciplines?Should primary schools set aside their natural enthusiasm for thematic approaches, and focus instead on strong, subject-based teaching?Should we be exerting top-down pressure on primary schools to deliver learning in this way?

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Information technology lessons in UK schools are so dull they are putting pupils off the subject and careers in computing, top scientists warn.

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Based on a year long ethnographic study in Toronto, Canada, this paper looks at how - contrary to many mainstream accounts - younger users do indeed care about protecting and controlling their personal information. However, their concerns revolve around what I call social privacy, rather than the more conventional institutional privacy. This paper also examines the somewhat subversive practices which users engaged in to enhance their own social privacy, and in some cases, violate that of others.

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Civitas said the retreat from traditional subjects was leading to a decline in social mobility.

“These children will be unable to access the world of high culture, which could transform their lives, because teachers have decided that they should not be challenged by anything beyond the scope of their immediate experience,” the study said.

Prof Conway added: “State schools only need freeing from excessive testing, an overly bureaucratised regime of inspection, and excessively prescriptive programmes of study, to be able once again to make provision of liberal education their central purpose.”

But a spokesman for the Department for Children, Schools and Families said: “Children sit just one set of national tests between starting primary school and taking their GCSEs, and we simply don’t agree that this amounts to ‘excessive testing’.

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