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Links 1 through 10 of 158 by Joe Germuska tagged language

Discussion of the rank names used by the Hutaree Militia (as well as the origin of 'hutaree' itself).

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“McDonald’s Fries the Holy Grail for Potato Farmers.”
“British Left Waffles on Falklands.”

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"Tell me," says Joel. "I swear this is just for me. I'll never use it. I just need to know. I will never use it on anyone. I swear. Just tell me."

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"Thousands of different Lego exist, yet when your seven-year-old asks for “a clippy bit,” you know exactly what to hand him. GILES TURNBULL surveys a caucus of children and determines a common nomenclature."

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"All Sorts is a collection of collective nouns that may or may not have found their way into the Oxford English Dictionary. If you think that a charismatic collective is far superior to a dullard ‘bunch’ or ‘flock’ then this is the place for you."

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'Ms. McKean wrote in a blog post on the Wordnik site: "We'll be planning and plotting and figuring out how best to add Wordie's right brain to Wordnik's left (and Wordie's chocolate to Wordnik's peanut butter) so that we can build the best darn dictionary of the future possible."'

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"The 1830s — a period of great vigour and expansiveness in the US — was also a decade of inventiveness in language, featuring a fashion for word play, obscure abbreviations, fanciful coinages, and puns."

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"Now, I really support quote-bowdlerizing. When I was like 12 (shut up, I was sheltered) I'd run across in, say, Sports Illustrated, some bad word that had clearly been written around. Far from feeling protected from the brutal English language, it would pique my curiosity. What rich epithet could lie behind those brackets? It really opened my eyes to the grand mystery of obscenity while emphasizing their power to bother grownups."

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A collection of colorful regional slang. The ones at the top are not unfamiliar, but some of the reader submissions later are pretty remarkable (and mostly crude...) ‘He was grinning like a mule eating briars.’ “Hell, she couldn’t pour piss out of a boot with instructions on the heel.”

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