Already a member? Log in

Sign up with your...

or

Sign Up with your email address

Add Tags

Duplicate Tags

Rename Tags

Share It With Others!

Save Link

Sign in

Sign Up with your email address

Sign up

By clicking the button, you agree to the Terms & Conditions.

Forgot Password?

Please enter your username below and press the send button.
A password reset link will be sent to you.

If you are unable to access the email address originally associated with your Delicious account, we recommend creating a new account.

ADVERTISEMENT

Links 1 through 10 of 32 by Joe Germuska tagged future

Three minutes of Clarke prognosticating, nailing telecommunications (including remote surgery, etc) but missing (at least somewhat) with the idea that cities will become obsolete. "man will no longer commute, he will communicate"

Share It With Others!

"Faced with the transformation of the digital, the newspaper industry chose to protect a business model rather than preserve its social function… My fear is that the universities are making the same mistake."

Share It With Others!

"We can expect changes in journalism to be linked to changes in subsidy. There are many shifts coming, but three big ones are an increase in direct participation; an increase in the leverage of the professionals working alongside the amateurs; and a second great age of patronage."

Share It With Others!

"It's July 2009, and in Johnson City, America's permanent colony on the moon - named after Lyndon B. Johnson, the president who authorised it - they are celebrating the third generation of lunar Americans: the first child born to parents themselves born on the moon. With just 5000 inhabitants, "city" is perhaps too grandiose a term. Those who had anticipated a domed city of the kind that once graced science fiction comics had also been disappointed. That idea never stood up to the harsh lunar reality of cosmic rays and meteorite bombardment."

Share It With Others!

'Mr Kildee acknowledged that some fellow Americans considered his solution "defeatist" but he insisted it was "no more defeatist than pruning an overgrown tree so it can bear fruit again". ;

Share It With Others!

"In the '70s, it was gonzo journalism. For us right now, it's guerrilla journalism, and we will not be stopped."

Share It With Others!

"Today I spent my lunch hour at the Newberry Library live-twittering the Make Media Matter panel discussion. It was an assemblage of heavy hitters in Chicago media (plus Carl Bernstein) talking about the “future of journalism” to a crowd of journalism students and members of professional journalism societies. Oh yeah, did I mention it was presented by the Independent Film Channel to promote the second season of The IFC Media Project with Gideon Yago? And that Lisa Madigan gave the opening remarks? Yeah, it was kind of random."

Share It With Others!

"In 2019, we live in superstructed realities, where physical life and digital life can merge together any way you choose.
Everyone is a media channel, and every body is a data stream. Every physical thing can be programmed for interaction, and every living thing can join your social network. Everything is rehearsed and relived. Every place is both physical and virtual.
Life is a customized version of what you want to see, who you want to be, and what you want to know.
Your superstructing tool kit in 2019 includes:
· Geolocation tools
· Biometrics and accelerometers
· Handheld augmented reality
· Simulation engines
· Lifecasting platforms
· Social networks for every living thing
· Avatars everywhere
· Virtual worlds based on real worlds
In your superstructed reality, what will you make? What will you play? What will you learn?"

Share It With Others!

"This is one of the times when being a greybeard is helpful. You see, I look at those bullet points, and I remember the IT establishment raising precisely those concerns, almost word-for-word, in the face of other New Things. For example: • Personal Computers • Unix • The Internet • Relational Databases"

Share It With Others!

"I knew then that the book's migration to the digital realm would not be a simple matter of trading ink for pixels, but would likely change the way we read, write and sell books in profound ways. It will make it easier for us to buy books, but at the same time make it easier to stop reading them. It will expand the universe of books at our fingertips, and transform the solitary act of reading into something far more social. It will give writers and publishers the chance to sell more obscure books, but it may well end up undermining some of the core attributes that we have associated with book reading for more than 500 years."

Share It With Others!

ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT
ADVERTISEMENT