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Links 1 through 10 of 202 by Paul K tagged fauna

A 17th German album of engravings of flowers, birds and insects that was intended to provide models for artists in jewellery, painting and book illustration etc from which to copy. We know very little about this album.

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19th century woodblock print series -- 'Ehon Taka Kagami' -- showing all manner of hawk and falcon training and behaviour. The pages were specially treated with mica dust to give a certain sheen or glitter to the feathering of the wings for instance. This is the most esteemed Japanese work on falcon/hawk training in history.

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Early 18th century science book on caterpillars changing into butterflies by the esteemed German illustrator, Maria Sibylla Merian. The work contains detailed observations and behavioural descriptions and is accompanied by around 150 beautiful and accurate engravings of insects and the plants they inhabit.

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7-volume series produced by one of the greats of 19th century ornithology publishing: John Gould. Coloured lithographic plates of realistic birds in approximately naturalistic settings.

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This atlas features 100 plates of attractive and well-executed, hand-coloured engravings of species from the low to the high of the animal kingdom. This volume features many lesser known species (in the 1840s) that was something of a supplement to a very large zoology series released over 15 years up to 1830.

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Extended excerpts and scanned images from a new book (review copy) by Chet Van Duzer: 'Sea Monsters on Medieval and Renaissance Maps'. This is an amazing piece of work on a subject that is both very cool, intriguing and has been little studied in the past. Illustrations cover the gamut from whale islands to lion-fish from the 10th to 17th centuries. A fabulous/remarkable publication from the British Library.

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19th century watercolour sketch album by unknown artists of myriad bird species. Nothing much is known about the work but the page designs are beautiful and the bird drawings themselves range from exquisite to slightly naive, as though it were a practice album.

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Album of hand-coloured marine species collected by French expeditionary voyage. L'Astrolabe, skippered by Dumont d'Urville, spent 3 years in 1820s sailing mostly in southern oceans looking for lost La Perouse expedition. Beautiful quality plates (including sectional anatomy views) resulted.

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Fun colourful lithographs from 1920s by Benjamin Rabier (father of La Vache qui Rit). These are slightly anthropomorphised animals that were originally intended as teaching aides for kids who Rabier hoped to introduce to to the prolific Enlightenment science work of Buffon. But over time Rabier made them more humorous than educational so the animals have exaggerated pseudo-human facial expressions and the rendering is closer to absurd than realistic.

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Some of the earliest watercolour sketches of animals, plants and local scenes in Australia. The English artist, John Lewin, arrived in Oz in 1800 and pursued an individual style that eschewed the staid and plastic classicism of European scientific drawing in favour of a more naturalistic approach that deployed the subjects among more true and real plants and atmosphere of their locality. So this collection is especially important in historical terms because it preserves some of the earliest tropes of a uniquely Australian identity (as obviously filtered by a European viewpoint).

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